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Schedules of the Constitution at a Glance

Schedules of the Constitution at a Glance

The Indian Constitution contains 12 schedules. The Government of India Act 1935, which had 10 Schedules, was one of the earliest legal documents to mention them.

Schedules of the Constitution at a Glance

The Indian Constitution contains 12 schedules. The Government of India Act 1935, which had 10 Schedules, was one of the earliest legal documents to mention them. The Indian Constitution later had 8 Schedules when it was adopted in 1949. 

An Overview of the Indian Constitution

  • The Bharatiya Savidhna, also known as the Indian Constitution, is the country's highest law.

  • In this document, a structural framework is laid out that clearly distinguishes between the fundamental political code, structure, powers, practices, obligations, and the authority of governmental institutions. The text outlines guiding principles, fundamental rights, and citizen obligations.

  • The longest-written national constitution is the one found in our nation. Dr B. R. Ambedkar, the chairman of the Drafting Committee at the time, served as its principal architect.

What do we need to know about schedules in the Constitution?

The lists that categorize and compile data about administrative processes and governmental policy are those that are referred to as schedules. Alternatively put, these are tables that include all the extra data not present in the articles.

There were a total of eight schedules in the Indian Constitution's early iterations. The total number of schedules currently stands at 12, following the addition of 4 new schedules through various amendments.

The schedules of the Indian Constitution

 

Schedules

Features of Schedules

  • First Schedule  (Article 1, Article 4)

  • The states and union territories of India are listed here, along with any changes to their borders and the various legal requirements that must be met.
  • Second Schedule  (Articles 59(3), 65(3), 75(6), 97, 125, 148(3), 158(3), 164(5), 186 And 221)

  • The salaries of judges, public servants, and the comptroller and auditor general are included in this schedule.
  • Third Schedule (Articles 75(4), 99, 124(6), 148(2), 164(3), 188 And 219)

  • Here is a list of the various oath or affirmation forms. The various oaths of office for judges and elected officials are described in detail.
  • Fourth Schedule (Articles 4(1) And 80(2))
  • This lists all of the seats that have been given to the Rajya Sabha or Upper House of Parliament based on states and union territories.
  • Fifth Schedule (Article 244(1)):
  • The rules for managing and controlling scheduled tribes and scheduled areas are listed.
  • Sixth Schedule (Articles 244(2) And 275(1))
  • The provisions established for the management of the tribal territories in the states of Meghalaya, Assam, Mizoram, and Tripura are listed below.
  • Seventh Schedule (Article 246) : 
  • The Union List (Central Government), State List (State), and Concurrent List make up this list.
  • Eighth schedule (Articles 344(1) and 351)
  • It contains a list of the most widely used recognized languages.
  • Article 31-B of the Ninth Schedule
  • It contains provisions relating to the approval of particular acts and regulations.
  • Tenth Schedule (Articles 102(2) And 191(2))

  • The anti-defection clauses for members of the Parliament and state legislatures are listed here. The criteria for disqualification due to defection are based on these provisions. 
  • Eleventh Schedule (Article 243-G)

  • It outlines the local governments, or panchayats, in rural areas that have the power, duties, and authority that have been assigned to them.
  • Twelfth Schedule (Article 243-w)
  • The power, duties, and authority assigned to the urban local government or municipalities are detailed in this schedule of the Indian constitution.
   

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