News Excerpt
Huntington’s disease can be challenging on a good day, therefore preparing for self-isolation and being informed on the best ways to cope during this difficult and confusing time of isolation due to COVID-19 is very important.

What is Huntingtin Disease?
•    It is a progressive brain disorder that causes uncontrolled movements, emotional problems, and loss of thinking ability (cognition).
•    Adult-onset Huntington disease, the most common form of this disorder, usually appears in a person's thirties or forties. Early signs and symptoms can include irritability, depression, small involuntary movements, poor coordination, and trouble learning new information or making decisions.
•    Many people with Huntington disease develop involuntary jerking or twitching movements known as chorea. As the disease progresses, these movements become more pronounced.
•    Affected individuals may have trouble walking, speaking, and swallowing. People with this disorder also experience changes in personality and a decline in thinking and reasoning abilities.
•    A less common form of Huntington disease known as the juvenile form begins in childhood or adolescence. It also involves movement problems and mental and emotional changes.
•    Additional signs of the juvenile form include slow movements, clumsiness, frequent falling, rigidity, slurred speech, and drooling. School performance declines as thinking and reasoning abilities become impaired.
•    Juvenile Huntington disease tends to progress more quickly than the adult-onset form; affected individuals usually live 10 to 15 years after signs and symptoms appear.
•    Mutations in the HTT gene cause Huntington disease. The HTT gene provides instructions for making a protein called huntingtin. Although the function of this protein is unknown, it appears to play an important role in nerve cells (neurons) in the brain.
•    There are no curative or preventive therapies, but there has been an explosion of research in the last few years.