Dengue

The Capital reported 243 dengue cases over the past week, and one death — the first this year. As per a civic report. The deceased was a 35-year-old woman from south Delhi’s Sarita Vihar, who succumbed to the vector-borne disease in late September at a private hospital.

 

Important Highlights:

  • The caseload for the current month stands at 382, including 139 cases reported till October 9. A total of 723 cases have been recorded this season (till October 16), the highest for the same period since 2018 — which saw 1,020 cases.
  • In September, the city reported 217 cases, which was also the highest case count for the month since 2018. Delhi recorded 1,072 cases and one death in 2020, 2,036 cases and two deaths in 2019, and 2,798 cases and four deaths in 2018.

 

Dengue

  • Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that has rapidly spread in all regions of WHO in recent years. Dengue virus is transmitted by female mosquitoes mainly of the species Aedes aegypti and, to a lesser extent, albopictus. These mosquitoes are also vectors of chikungunya, yellow fever and Zika viruses. Dengue is widespread throughout the tropics, with local variations in risk influenced by rainfall, temperature, relative humidity and unplanned rapid urbanization.
  • Dengue causes a wide spectrum of disease. This can range from subclinical disease (people may not know they are even infected) to severe flu-like symptoms in those infected. Although less common, some people develop severe dengue, which can be any number of complications associated with severe bleeding, organ impairment and/or plasma leakage. Severe dengue has a higher risk of death when not managed appropriately.
  • Dengue is caused by a virus of the Flaviviridae family and there are four distinct, but closely related, serotypes of the virus that cause dengue (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4). Recovery from infection is believed to provide lifelong immunity against that serotype.
  • Dengue is a severe, flu-like illness that affects infants, young children and adults, but seldom causes death. Symptoms usually last for 2–7 days, after an incubation period of 4–10 days after the bite from an infected mosquito. The World Health Organization classifies dengue into 2 major categories: dengue (with / without warning signs) and severe dengue.